Tazara Railway and Victoria Falls

Tazara stands for Tanzania-Zambia Railway Authority, originally this 1800 km track was built by Chinese in 1970’s. This journal entry is from my trip from Dar es Salaam to Victoria Falls in autumn 2010. (Reblog with more images)

On the journey somewhere in Tanzania.

Sept 26 — First day in Dar es Salaam, or “Dar” as locals call it. City is by the sea, there are few restaurants and hotels, but not as much as one could expect from the size of it. This was once center of German East African colony. British annexed it during First World War. Some buildings e.g churches are from that period, although most seem newer. Population is mix of Muslims (city was found by them, and has easy access from Middle East), Christians that came during colonial period, and Indians, also relatively close. Nowadays Chinese seem to grow their presence in this part of world. New cars and motorbikes are Chinese, infrastructure projects also done by them. Dar is biggest city and main port of Tanzania. It’s also industrial center of this otherwise rural country. There are also tourist attractions near by, Zanzibar for example. @ Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

Views from Dar es Salaam harbor and fish market.

Sept 27 — Managed to find myself way forward from Dar. Solution is Tazara train from Dar to Capiri-Mposhi, near Lusaka in Zambia. From there Victoria Falls should be relatively close. @ Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

Oct 2 — Tazara is around 1800km track built by Chinese in 1970’s. Chinese letters come by everywhere, in buildings, machines. 40 years ago during cold war, Africa was divided into two sides like rest of the world. Zambia had copper available for world trade, but difficulties delivering it abroad. Mao’s China stepped in to help with African comrades, Tazara railway was largest single foreign-aid project undertaken by China at the time.

Our train left 12 hours late from schedule! At night, we thought there was riot breaking out at the station. People were protesting delays, everyone exhausted and angry of waiting. Heard two possible causes for the ordeal: technical problems with the old train, and politics of two jointly operated railway, between Tanzanians and Zambians. Eventually train got rolling, and has been going steadily ever since. Train is nice way to enjoy views of African countryside, relax, read and just hangout more freely than in sardine can of a bus. @ Train from Dar es Salaam to Capiri-Mposhi

Views along the route.

On every station people were selling fruits and food for the passengers.

Oct 4 — Our trip has progressed nicely, two full days in train from coast to inland. Irony of long delay in the beginning, was that train could have not arrived better time in early morning. From Lusaka I got nice impression, and would not mind to stay there a while, unless transit didn’t arrange so conveniently. Bus to Livinstone started interestingly, preacher marching in our bus back and forth and waving his bible. He shouted to us about dangers of AIDS, poverty and other things people dislike. Finally after couple hallelujahs he collected alms, thanked and left. Blessed trip indeed! Least from quick glance from bus, Zambia seems more industrious than Tanzania did. Roads are better, houses in good paint and modern equipment in agriculture, machines instead of human and animal labor. Been meeting interesting travelers from USA, Australia, Japan and of course Africa. @ Bus from Lusaka to Livingstone

In Livinstone.

Oct 5 — Livingstone is small Zambian town at the Victoria Falls, and has managed to turn its tourism revenues in favor for local community. Main street can be seen in 10 mins, but there is basically everything one can ask for: markets, banks, post office, few bars, restaurants etc. Streets are good, road was excellent all the way from Lusaka, town is clean.

Zambian-Zimbabwean border.

Falls themselves are just as stunning as one might expect. Peak of rain season is in April, thats when water masses coming down from cliffs are in their biggest. Rocks are reverberating due to falling water. Now in October it wasn’t bad either, one can go walking to rocky upstream, go swimming in natural pools that river has carved. Some pools are only few steps away from two hundred meter fall, it’s surreal feeling to go swim in them. Falls are by the border of Zambia and Zimbabwe, both sides have great views. At the entrance there is statue of Dr.Livingstone, founder of the falls and African explorer, big hero of his time. He eventually died in this town because of Malaria, and buried in England in 1870’s. @ Livingstone


Kilimanjaro Climb Diary

Diary from camps along the climb highest mountain in Africa, autumn 2010. (Reblog with more images)

Crossing Kenyan-Tanzanian border.

Sept 18 — After a ~6 hour bumpy drive from Nairobi, I crossed Kenyan-Tanzanian border and arrived to Arusha. Moshi and Arisha are two towns at the foot of Kilimanjaro mountain. Road was very bumpy and both we and our bags were jumping along the way. While road was bad, views were interesting. Never seen African savanna before. Tomorrow begins my 5 day climb to Kilimanjaro, tallest mountain of the whole continent. @ Arusha, Tanzania

Climb beginning from densely forested foot of the mountain.

Sept 19 — We came in the morning from Arusha and started climbing Machame route which is second hardest way to top. Wish I brought enough clothes with me, temp here in 3000 meters is already close to 0 at night. Most of todays climb was in the rainforest, but first camp is just where forest ends. Track was well maintained, should be doable also in rain season. @ Machame gate to Machame hut

Forested low slopes of mountain.

Sept 20 — Nights up here are really freezing, which probably is not surprise to anyone but me! Second day climbing wise was tougher than first but still manageable. Climb took only 5h today, and we started early so had plenty time once camp was reached. Second camp is in more open ground than previous, more space for tents, but winds are stronger. Had a problem getting sleep previous night, hope this is better. @ Machame hut to Shira hut

Arid lava fields and rocky towers.

Sept 21 — Its 2.30pm and am sitting in my tent after climb today. Route was mix of up and down hills and crossing volcanic valleys. Descending was real pain for knees, 0.5-1 meter jumps all the time. Anyway, it went fine without incident, but my back pack felt heavier than before this trip. Nature is simply beautiful and worth all the trouble. Looking at fantastic volcano moulded valleys, cliff walls and towers makes sometimes feel dizzy and risk of losing balance. @ Shira hut to Barranco hut

Having break and rest in between climbs.

Sept 22 — Today was most exhausting day so far, 8hrs of rising and descending hills surrounding the mountain top. We finally reached Barafu hut from where we start climb to top at midnight. Muscles are protesting, but guess one more day is fine. Kilimanjaro, even from this high elevation at 4600 meters looks majestic and remote, impossible to reach. Views from this camp are best so far! Tomorrow after reaching peak, we have last camp, oh I miss it already! 🙂 @ Barranco hut to Barafu hut

Views at the top, around 6000 meters.

Sept 23 — Kilimanjaro is conquered! We reached Uhuru peak at 5985 meters when sun was rising (~6am), after exhausting climb in a dim moon light. Wind and cold top were merciless! Climb would have been tough for anyone, but scenery was breathtaking: gigantic ice glaciers, valleys and volcanic rock formations, curved horizon with cloud mattress reaching somewhere very far! Mountains peaking through floor of clouds, and this all painted in orange, red and yellow colors of rising sun! During climb some people could not handle the exhaustion, and had to turn back. I never done such a climb before, worst was the feel of sleepiness and dizzy head, from lack of oxygen, so that sense of balance gets numb and prone to errors. All I could do was to take smaller steps, and breath high pace like when running. It seemed to work, so remaining challenge was physical load and cold. After reaching the top and awing the scenes, we descended halfway to Mweka hut for last camp. Trees are already growing on these heights. It will be nice to have shower and shave tomorrow after 5-days 🙂 @ Barafu hut to Mweka hut

Sunrise at altitude where horizon is curved.

Sept 24 — Back from Kilimanjaro, and am staying one night in Mochi. Tomorrow bus to Dar es Salaam starts its way at 7am, but been now used to very early wake ups in mountain. Due to cold it simply was not possible sleep enough. Returning from mountain didn’t have any surprises, legs are still like on fire. Looking back, what would I do different before heading to mountain: 1. Travel agent. I used Kenyan one. Moshi or Arusha have tour operators to choose from. These two towns run climbing business and there is also plenty of accommodation available. I’d come directly here. 2. Gear wise I wasn’t prepared well enough. My boots, jacket and clothes were ok during day time. But at higher, and at night just too cold. 3. Tips. Porters (person carrying items for tourists at Kilimanjaro national park) are paid low salaries by travel companies, and tips from tourists mean a lot for them. I had surprise last day when my tips were protested, and had to go for ATM for some more.

Descend has begun.

A final comment. Yesterday in Mweka hut one porter died due to heart attack probably resulting from carrying heavy loads on high altitudes. Man was 6 years younger than me. Its the darker side of Kilimanjaro tourism, work of a slave like porters call it themselves. Kilimanjaro is natural park, without roads for vehicles or even donkeys. All is carried by people. And so they carry things like sun stools and beer for tourists, and get paid few dollars for this crazy job @ Moshi, Tanzania

Kachin State — Myanmar’s Christian North

This post is part of series documenting travel in Myanmar, Cuba and Iran: Introduction.

Confluence of the N’mai and Mali rivers. Both originate as small streams on the Tibetan Plateau, and draw their waters from Himalayan-range glaciers. My tuktuk driver explained that N’mai is coming from China and Mali from India. Its not entirely clear wether the source of both rivers are in Burmese side or not. Judging the maps, some small streams indeed seem to come across the borders. The confluence is the origin of Irrawaddy River, Myanmars main waterway that flows through the country, all the way to Bay of Bengal.


June 2015

Train to Myitkyina. We leave squeaking and shaking from Mandalay station into the night. Watching out into darkness, communities are living by the faintly lit streets. Phone and TV screens are glowing back from there. Next morning we should be well on the way to north and after 24hrs should arrive to Myitkyina, Kachin state of Myanmar.

Train traveling.


Morning. Last night went without a sleep, not even the lightest dozing, ride is just too jumpy. Locals didn’t seem to mind much and kept sleeping. Outside our wagon, day is slowly opening. Clouds are looming low, and fields are wet. All the windows are open, sudden shower could wash us all inside. Farmers with their oxen are already plowing the paddies. “Iron-buffaloes” that are a norm in neighbouring Thailand, can be seen also occasionally. Change is coming also in remote parts of Myanmar. On railroads no such luck, were are using same tracks built by British for their locomotives 100+ years ago. Burmese trains defy the laws of gravity, to be put mildly.

Ages old scenes meet today in north Myanmar.

Myitkyina. Wide Irrawaddy is quiet. Night is coming and different shades over blue are descending over it. Due to the military restrictions, there is no traffic in the river. Water is plenty and level high, it would be easy to sail to Bhamo in south. Christian churches are everywhere, outnumbering the Buddhist temples in the city. A work of European missionaries in 19th century, who converted the local animist population to followers of Christ. Still, when looking the statistics, Buddhism is dominant religion also in Kachin state like in the rest of Myanmar.

Street market in Myitkyina.

Bhamo-Katha river boat.

Two pranksters in Myitkyina.

View from U-Bein bridge Mandalay, April 2013 & June 2015.

South Myanmar in Photos

This post is part of series documenting travel in Myanmar, Cuba and Iran: Introduction.


June 2015

Most travelers head north from Yangon, Bagan and Inle-lake especially. But south-east of the country offers fascinating sights to see as well. Here are couple photos from Moulmein and Hpa-An.

Moulmein. Worlds largest reclining Buddha at Mudon.







Amazing cloud of bats going for eat, every sunset.

Cuban Reflections

This post is part of series documenting travel in Myanmar, Cuba and Iran: Introduction.


March 2016

Here are twenty photos and some reflections from the trip to Cuba. Because its tropical flora and fauna, couldn’t help comparing the country to South East Asia that has become familiar in past years.

Malecon, Havana.


What can I write about Cubans? They are music lovers and party people more than anything. Salsa is in their DNA. So are their love for fat cigars and rum. The liquor is even sold in small tetra packs. I spotted often guys sipping innocent looking small boxes and wondered whats the sudden juice or soda passion for grown up men. But no it is Ron Planchao, 40% alcohol. That explained! People are not proud but self confident. Locals often greet foreigners and welcoming them for happy holidays.


From the trio of countries that I’ve been documenting, Cuba is by far most touristy. Ocean cruisers bring hundreds at a time, and so does the busy Havana airport. When hearing the news that Cuba is opening to international community and blockades are history, many wont realise that in tourism industry that happen already 20 years ago. After fall of Soviet Union, Cuba lost not just an ally, but main customer for its agricultural products. From then on, tourists from Canada and Europe brought desperately needed foreign currency. Venezuela provided cheap oil that prevented economic wheels from stalling completely.


The island is flat, Cuba’s highest peak does not reach 2000m. Scenes from bus: Sugar cane fields and rice paddies. Small sloping hills, palm trees and more fields and greenery.

Vienales in west of island has landscape that remind scenes from South East Asia.

Farm animals are everywhere. It’s nice to see cowboy slowly riding to the fields in the mellow evening light, to return livestock back after grassing the day out. Condors gliding lazily with air currents and screening the world underneath. Another common bird that can be seen in shores is the pelican.


Ride paddies are not worked as meticulously as in Asia, where rice has always been backbone of feeding populations. Burmese or Thai farmer could be shocked to see how temporary the mud walls that form the pools are. They seem like pulled up quickly with tractor, not carved to the soil in shape that farmer passes on to his son.




Streets are in pretty good condition, although street lights at night are dim. Lack of light pollution means bright night skies even in city centers. Traffic culture more expectable than in Asia, car drivers and pedestrians respecting each other.


Shops and markets lack the endless variety and full shelf’s like in more prosperous countries. There were some queues occasionally, but in general shops always have least one brand of product’s on offer, and shelf’s were never completely empty.

Trinidad, locomotive drivers.


Weather in March has been really a dream. Constant winds, especially in Havana and northern side of island are refreshing. In south side, and especially Santiago, air was more stale and walking around in mid day not as nice.



Viazul is Cuban hard currency bus company. Many tourists are using their busses while traveling in Cuba. Drivers are pretty well motivated, but are making bit extra on their own. Busses always have front seats that passengers cannot use. Those are for people that are picked up from hitching by the road side, and pay directly to drivers.

In a bus. Co-driver relaxing, texting and chatting with the driver.

They are funny blokes to watch, wheeling and dealing their own along the way. When they feel like a juice, for instance, they stop by the shop, all passengers watching and waiting. Or when the other one knows a good basket shop on the way. The duo again disappear to a road side shop for a minute, and return smiling with nice new baskets in their hands. Chinese made busses are in ok condition, and schedule holds pretty well. That ensures no big protest arise when another surprise stop happens. Things run, but bit differently in Cuba.

Patagonia: Torres del Paine and Perito Moreno

Spring 2011, exploring Chilean and Argentinean Patagonia.

April 5 2011 — Arrived ok to Puerto Natales before noon, by boat from Puerto Montt. Weather was more sunny today, it was quite misty and rainy boat trip. But views and trip in general was memorable. There were not many signs of human settlement along the Chilean coast. At one part of the way, boat exits from protecting archipelago to open seas of South Pacific (Golfo de Penas). That happened in the middle of night while sleeping. I woke being inside giant washing machine. My cabin mate was lifting our bags from floor that had buckets of water rolling. Nice wakeup! @ Puerto Natales

Puerto Natales, Chile

April 7 2011 — Went to Torres del Paine today. Scenery was just stunning, postcard like! High mountains, bright blue and green lagoons, dramatic cloudy skies, guanacos and condors. Weather also was gentle for us, as this time of year it can rain days in row. At some places, winds were very strong. It indeed felt like the edge of the world, just as Tibet was the roof of world.

Torres del Paine national park, Chile

I’ve ended up much more South than originally planned, tomorrow its time to start correcting the “error” and jump bus to El Calafate, see glaciers and continue again North towards Buenos Aires @ Puerto Natales

On Road in Patagonia

April 8 2011 — Came to Argentina today. My first visit to Chile left only good memories. Beautiful country and people! Drive North from Porto Natales was through empty pampas that had only cattle grazing on few spots. In its vast emptiness, scene evokes imagination. How would it be to live here… @ El Calafate

Glacier Perito Moreno, Argentina

April 10 2011 — Lazy Sunday in Calafate, and tomorrow morning bus to Comodoro Rivadavia. Did some laundry today + organizing photos from past days.

Trip to Glacier Perito Moreno was another highlight of my trip in this part of world. Weather was nice in afternoon, and ice monolith is just massive. It is a river of ice, that rolls forward like a slow lava. Ice constantly lives, cracks size of a building falling off and splashing to water. Current melting edge was snow in high Andes, about 500 years ago. So, at the time Columbus was trying to find new sea route from Europe to India, water was frozen and became part of glacier. Gives a bit of perspective to our human limitations. @ El Calafate